You can do that Milano Centrale in Milan because the scenery will make you forget everything else! This station replaced two stations – The former central station built in 1864 and Simplon Tunnel from 1906.

They drew inspiration from Washington’s Union Station, but later, under Mussolini, the station became grander and more ambitious. The station has around 500 trains passing through daily, taking commuters to all parts of Italy and beyond.

Check out the most incredible train stations!

1. Shinjuku Station

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Where: Tokyo, Japan

This may not be the most beautiful station, but it’s the numbers that use Shinjuku Station in Tokyo, are jaw-dropping! Reports vary, but it seems that around 2 million people head to this daily! It’s the busiest transport hub in the world and has been recognized by the Guinness World Records as such. There are 200 exits and 51 platforms!

2. The Gare du Nord

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Where: Paris

The Gare du Nord in Paris opened up in 1864, and is one of the oldest in the world! There are 23 statues on the outside of the building, representing a different destination that the rail line has. Inside are massive windows, letting in lots of natural light.

You may have seen the station in movies like The Bourne Identity and The Bourne Ultimatum. Also Mr. Beans Holiday and Oceans Twelve. It’s crowned amongst the world’s most beautiful stations.

3. Kuala Lumpur’s railway station

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Where: Malaysia

Also Read: 11 Amazing Things To Do In Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Western and Eastern influences meet perfectly at Kuala Lumpur’s railway station. Completed in 1910, this station cost $23 000.00 to complete.

The Station Hotel occupied a large part of the station and was renamed the Heritage Station Hotel in 1996. The hotel shut its door in 2010, and round about the same time – long-distance trains started using another station. The station now only serves commuter trains.

4. Madrid Atocha Station

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Where: Spain

Also Read: A Complete Travel Guide To Munnar Hill Station

The largest train station in Madrid is the Madrid Atocha Station, and it’s a remarkable structure – boasting both steel and glass construction. It’s one of the most amazing railway stations around the world. 

What makes this station really stand out, are the tropical gardens in the middle of the station. There are sculptures around as well, making the waiting for trains a rather relaxing experience.

5. Antwerp Central Station

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Where: Belgium

As long as you can sneak a peek at the much talked about Antwerp Central Station. Classed as one of the world’s most incredible stations, it was built between 1895 and 1905.

There’s a massive dome covering the station, a viaduct, shopping malls, and a diamond gallery. It received the nickname The Railway Cathedral and was designed by J Van Asperen. It’s one of the incredible railway stations across the world. 

6. Estação de São Bento, Porto

Where: Portugal

In 1896, São Bento, the first train was taken into the station. Architect Marques da Silva had been inspired by Parisian architecture for its external design and, inside, artist Jorge Colaço gave 14 years working out on a massive azulejo tile scenery.

Even people in hurry give pause to their feet to glare upon its 20,000 hand-painted, shiny-tin, blue, and white tiles. It’s a busy terminal for trains having their way to the suburbs of Porto; also having trips, to and from Portugal’s capital city of Lisbon.

7. Grand Central Terminal

Where: New York City, New York

The world’s largest train station welcomes its travelers with open arms underneath the tick-tocking face of the world’s biggest Tiffany clock. With a multitude of weekday crowds, the Aquamarine ceiling bends with six gold-leafed indications of the Zodiac, popularly pictured in reverse order.

Created by Cornelius Vanderbilt in 1871, the crowd can still buy tickets through the original gold prohibited ticket windows and give themselves a reason to entertain during stopovers with buzzing galleries, secret bars, and a halt at its all-time popular, Oyster Bar.

8. St. Pancras International

Where: London, England

The magnificent Victorian structure is adorned with a red-brick, Gothic exterior that is rigid. But this station is soft from inside, where you can hold a seat at the longest champagne bar of Europe.

It took 20 years to build this huge station and, when completed in 1868, it was the largest enclosure in the world for some time. Apparently undisturbed by the striking and damaging of bombs in in World War II, St. Pancras is the entrance to Britain’s National Rail network.

9. Dunedin Railway Station

Where: Dunedin, New Zealand

In 1906, Architect George Troup was popularly known as “Gingerbread George” after the finalization of this beautiful architecture, Flemish Renaissance-style station.

The construction is of Basalt from the small city of Kokonga and white Oamaru stone, it has been a centre of attraction for plenty of tourists, looking for having pictures of themselves and a starting mark for picturesque tours on the local Dunedin line.

10. Kanazawa Station

Where: Kanazawa, Japan

Initially, it was opened in 1898, this station was known worldwide when in 2005, the modern tsuzumi (drum) entrance to the station was revealed. An aluminum dome, having glass shelters are the main attractions, along with sieving light into the restaurants and shops inside.

The addition of such a huge-scale modern architecture in this traditional city was not particularly well appreciated at that time, but since then it has attracted a good share of its fans.

11. Helsinki Central Station

Where: Helsinki, Finland

Originally built in 1862, this station was too tiny for its needs, so in 1904, a competition was opened for a new design. Out of 21 entries, a design of National Romanticism was selected, which ignited debate on public building designs, calling for a more modern, practical look. Fortunately, Eliel Saarinen, the winning architect, was happy to make it.

Most of the place is decorated in Finnish granite, this station was opened in 1919 and symbolized by the Saarinen’s signature Art Nouveau style. Four huge sentry sculptures having spherical lights are being witnessed by hundreds of thousands of visitors every day.

12. Liège-Guillemins Station

Where: Liège, Belgium

Outside Brussels, Liege is the third largest city in Belgium, and it is the gateway to high-speed trains across Europe. In May 1842, the first railway station of Liège-Guillemins was inaugurated, but this most current establishment was made known in 2009.

The design of glass, steel, and white concrete by Santiago Calatrava has earned praise in modern architecture, and the light which spread throughout the structure, making along, commute much amiable.

13. Tanggula Mountain Railway Station, The World’s Highest Train Station

Where: Tibet

Located at a mind-boggling altitude of 16,627 feet (5,068 meters) above sea level, Tanggula Mountain Railway Station is the world’s highest train station in the Tibet Autonomous Region.

Even though travelers are restricted from boarding or coming down at this station as of 2010, still, several routes on the China railway network pass through here. It is not surprising for trains to every now and then stops here in wait of other trains to pass, letting passengers have the glimpse of the surrounding mountainous region.

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