spooky places in America

The abandoned buildings, old mines, and the spooky globe: These are a few of the most haunted locations in the country.

These side-tracked cities throughout the nation will give you goosebumps. Just plan your visit to these spine-chilling adventure places.

Most Spooky Places in America 

1. St. Elmo, Colorado

St. Elmo, Colorado
Via: st-elmo-colorado.com

St. Elmo was formerly known as Forest City and was once a lively mining center, with a population of 2,000 at its apex. However, only seven people reportedly lived there by 1930, including the family who ran the general store and a hotel- the one who is rumored to haunt the place to this day.

Nowadays, it is inherited and maintained privately, visitors can still move back and forth by the small town, which is famous for most paranormal activity in the state.

2. Terlingua, Texas

Terlingua, Texas
Via: pinimg.com

However, after the crash of the mercury market, most of the residents escaped, although Terlingua remains kind of bustling. Visitors can have a refreshment on chilies at the “internationally acclaimed” restaurant, grip onto drink in the salon, explore the ruins, and enjoy the voyage of halls of the old jail during their time at the historical hotspot.

3. Virginia City and Nevada City, Montana 

Virginia City and Nevada City, Montana
Via: motorhome.com

Are you anyway interested in facing the deadly fear of trying to survive in the gun-slinging Old West? The long-ago home of the Calamity Jane of Virginia City has opposed the change since 1863, hundreds of historical buildings are still standing.

One mile down the road on Alder Gulch is Nevada City, another city which exploded and thundered kudos to the Gold Rush. Ride a train between two cities, where you can see real historic happenings through history shows (the hanging of Red Yeager) and can witness early settlers struggling to survive. The life’s reality in a Gold Rush city is in favor of leaving you trembled.

4. Bodie, California

Bodie, California
Via: countryliving.com

Bodie is amongst the most spooky places, a place abandoned by disheartened gold rushers who followed William Bodie to the city, but didn’t succeed- in search of more precious metals that he had discovered in 1859, this famous ghost town in California Over 150 years have been bizarrely left untouched.

Shacks or roughly built cabins are still standing with the table set, on hold for their long-standing residents to return, while shops and restaurants are still furnished with some supplies, which are ready to serve customers who will never reach. Giving you goosebumps? That a crap spooky; isn’t it?

5. Cahawba, Alabama

Cahawba, Alabama
Via: strangeabandonedplaces.com

Selma’s southwest is “Alabama’s most famous ghost town”. Within the time period of 1820 to 1825, as a state’s first permanent capital, a bustling center for the trade and transportation of cotton before the Civil War and a village for free slaves after the war, this city made numerous comebacks at the convergence of the Alabama and Cahaba rivers after floods and yellow fever endemics.

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Miserably, by 1900, all its natives moved aimlessly away for goods. Old Cahawba Archaeological Park known in present times, the town and its abandoned streets, graveyards and remnants have been the background for many ghost tales including one about a ghostly spherical body appearing in a now-faded garden puzzle at the home of C. C. Pegues.

6. Kennecott, Alaska

Kennecott, Alaska
Via: amazonaws.com

Kennecott is investigated to be the best remaining example of early copper mining of the 20th century, this mill is found amidst Alaska’s huge Wrangell- St. Elias National Park at the end of the 60-mile dirt road. From 1911 until 1938, Kennecott employed 300 people in the mill town and 300 in the mines, processing about 200 million worth of copper.

As a company city, it included a  school, hospital, general store, skating rink, tennis court, entertainment hall, and dairy.

However, until 1938, the copper ore was bankrupt, and the Kennecott Copper Corporation suddenly abandoned the city leaving its equipment buildings and their personal belongings behind.

The National Park Service and tour operators offer you access to 14-story concentration mill and many other historic buildings, singing tales of fortunate luck, strong and relentless frontiersmen, and terrible endings in the isolated wilderness.

7. Bannack, Montana

Bannack, Montana
Via: fineartamerica.com

In Montana, this inhabitant and abandoned former mining town is so damaged with paranormal activity, which was shown in an episode of Ghost Adventures on Travel Channel. Set up in 1862, when John White discovered gold on the Grasshopper Creek, Bannack was a classic gold rush city in the Wild West.

In the nearby Virginia city, after gold was found there, many prospectors shifted there and the road between two towns became a scene of more difficulties, robberies, and murders than almost any other stagecoach route – with the leader of the bandit gang later discovered to be Bannack’s very own sheriff.

The city of mines lasted for a long time, its population was finally moving between the 1930s and 1950s, at the stage when the state of Montana made a well-protected town a state park. In recent times, more than sixty structures are still standing, most of which can be traced.

8. South Pass City, Wyoming

South Pass City, Wyoming
Via: onlyinyourstate.com

Also Read: Top 8 Haunted Tunnels In The World

In the American West, the South Pass City is one more well-preserved mining town founded in 1867 when large Carissa gold deposit was discovered near the Sweetwater River.

The location is approximately 10 miles north of the Oregon Trail on the Continental Divide in the Rocky Mountains, a large crowd of explorers soon moved down to areas despite severe circumstances in hope of hammering it rich.

The population number excelled to approximately 2,000 people within a year, including men mostly, and saloons, brothels (house of prostitution), and the noisy, mysterious, and dangerous life of a frontier town were at a peak.

Regardless of throwing themselves into the back-breaking work, the explorers didn’t find more large gold deposits, so by the mid of the 1870s, only 100 people were remaining.

In 1949, homes, shops, hotels and saloons were deteriorated, with the last of the pioneer families that ran away.

Today, to a lesser extent residents have returned to live in the South Pass City, and the South Pass City State Historic Site signifies more than 30 secured historic structures dating from the prime time of the city.

9. Centralia, Pennsylvania

Centralia, Pennsylvania
Via: blog.hu

With lethal gases and smoke coming out of every corner and opening, this Pennsylvania city has been simmering from 1962- and its underground fire is expected to burn for over 250 years.

The dumping ground was set to fire in an abandoned coal mine, which quickly spread into the nerves of coal deposits, which once was the key to the prosperity of Centralia. When the initial damage occurred, the disaster-damaged 140 acres of city and surrounding area.

The natives departed the place, homes were leveled, and the highway was closed down as the disastrous and giant fire caused choked sinkholes ejecting fumes.

Only six remained out of almost 2,000 Central residents who were caught in the mine’s fire, determined to make the few streets and buildings in this destructive city their home until they die.

10. Thurmond, West Virginia

Thurmond, West Virginia
Via: onlyinyourstate.com

Thurmond city is still actually filled with five people living in this West Virginia city there are five people, which is now a ghost of the developing community. In earlier times, was a big stop on the Chesapeake & Ohio Railway, the invention of the diesel locomotive in the 1950s made the coal-driven railway route out-of-date. Now the train depot is a museum, called, Amtrak station.

11. Glenrio, Texas/New Mexico

Glenrio, Texas, New Mexico
Via: worldatlas.com

Glenrio Historic District is recorded in the National Register of Historic Places, involving old Route 66 roadbed and 17 abandoned buildings, such as State Line Bar, Little Juarez Dinner, and State Line Motel, now there is no motor vehicle in its broken signs. That it is “last in Texas” – or the “first” depending upon your direction of travel via American West.

12. Bulowville, Florida

Bulowville, Florida
Via: Pinterest.com

In 1821 Charles Bulow cleared the natural forest to the ground of 2,200 acres of the plantation to grow sugar sugarcane, cotton, Indigo, and rice.

The East Florida land was soon home to area’s largest sugar mill, built by John, Bulow’s son. Its title did not last long, however, during the Second Seminole War, Seminole Indians set fire to plantations and mill in 1836.

The construction of the harsh local Coquina rock, the large ruins of the mill now rise supernaturally among the large oak trees, which have reclaimed the land in the 150-acre Bull Plantation Ruins Historic State Park, while the collapsing foundation of the plantation house and the slave cabins show the volatility of Florida frontier life.

13. Essex County Jail Annex, North Caldwell, New Jersey

Essex County Jail Annex, North Caldwell, New Jersey
Via: pinimg.com

Victorian-style Essex County Jail Annex in New Jersey is an abandoned, creepy, and haunting prison. Initially, in 1873, it was built and developed over the years to include an auditorium, hospital, and cafeteria, and much of the facility was closed down in the 1970s and was abandoned for good in the late 1990s.

14. Grossinger’s Catskill Resort, Liberty, New York

Grossinger's Catskill Resort, Liberty, New York
Via: cloudfront.net

Grossinger’s Catskill Resort was sort of seasonal retreat featured in Dirty Dancing once in its prime time, where wealthy families in the 1950s spent their summer time in toe massive swimming pools, playing off golf or tennis, enjoying the lavish 1,200-acre surroundings just at two hours distance from north of New York.

In winters, it offers theatre and skiing, the first place to use artificial snowfall on its slopes in the world.

Here a few exquisite places such as cabins, cottages, hotel, landing strip, resorts that served hundreds and thousands of guests until it was closed in the mid-1980s and now still remain undestroyed and horribly damaged.

Discarded lounge chairs fill the poolside area. There are a hotel lobby and ballroom with twin staircases, massive fireplaces, and a checkerboard ceiling show its former glory.

If you listen carefully, you might still hear the jingling of cocktails glasses or the clicks of heels dancing the ballroom dance.

15. Rolling Acres Mall, Akron, Ohio

Rolling Acres Mall, Akron, Ohio
Via: time.com

The Rolling Acres Mall is in the list of most spooky places in America and was once home to more than 140 stores, a movie theater and a food court that was built in 1975 and was developed several times.

But in 2008, the mall was shut down and only two large retailers continued to operate, with all stores finally closing in 2013.

The owners have changed many times and currently in the process of ruling out, once -bustling mall will probably be demolished.

Until then, there is an abandoned empty relic of modern civilization occupying 1,300,000 sq ft of place, having cracked glass roofs in the cold during the winter storms, such as the structure standing isolated in a post-apocalyptic wasteland.

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